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International publication on new methods for studying human behaviour

A special volume of the journal Quaternary International will be published by two IPHES members, a Japanese researcher and a UAM lecturer.

4 women and a destiny: researchers from IPHES carry out research stays in the United Kingdom

The aim is to develop research on different scientific fields such as lithic technology, zooarchaeology and archaeobotany  

Humans were present in the Philippine islands as early as 700,000 years ago

An international team of prehistorians led by Dr Thomas Ingicco from the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, France, and M. Clyde Shago, from the National Museum of the Philippines discovered the oldest evidences for the peopling of the Philippines by Hominins.

Tarragona will host the XI Jornadas de Jóvenes Investigadores en Arqueología

It will take place from 9th to 12th May, at campus Catalunya (URV) This conference is focused on young non doctors researchers in archaeology and its related disciplines

John Charles Willman, new Marie Curie researcher at IPHES to study the use of “teeth-as-tools”

The chronological focus, between 9,000 and 3,000 years ago, provides an ideal case study given the extensive socioeconomic reorganization that is attributable to the transition from foraging to food production including increases in social stratification and

Comunicat de defunció del nostre company Lluís Batista

L'Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social lamenta comunicar el traspàs del nostre company i amic Lluís Batista.
En nom de tota la comunitat de l’IPHES volem expressar el més sentit condol.

The IPHES obtains the ‘HR Excellence in Research’ logo awarded by the European Commission

The HRS4R Action Plan comprises actions related to 4 pillars: ethical and professional aspects, recruitment, working conditions and Social Security, and training

Discovered the earliest modern human out of Africa

It is a left side of an adult upper jawbone including most of the dentition was found at Misliya Cave in Israel

The preferred use of the right hand is more ancient than it was thought and it is an ancestral characteristic of first hominins

It was considered that Neandertals were the first species with well-defined handedness, but a new international research led by IPHES goes back it to the first Homo species, Homo habilis.

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